Every purchase at Audrey's supports the Skirball's educational programs.


Women Hold Up Half the Sky Holiday Pop-up Shop Participating Organizations

Women Hold Up Half the Sky: Handcrafted goods from around the world

Merchandise Key

for the home

For the home

jewelry

Jewelry

handbags

Handbags

hats, scarves, and more

Hats, scarves, and more

for children

For children

stationery

Stationery

In conjunction with Women Hold Up Half the Sky, on view October 27, 2011-May 20, 2012, and commemorating the United Nations 2012 International Year of Cooperatives, Audrey's Museum Store at the Skirball offers handcrafted items representing women's cooperatives and female artisans from around the world. Each organization represents the transformative power of women working together to provide for their families, educate their children, pass on deep-rooted traditions, and promote gender equality. Click on each organization below to learn more.

 

Vendor
Region
Merchandise Selection
Fair Trade Federation member
Video
Africa Schools for Kenya
Kenya
jewelry
 
Watch video

BeadMarket artisan

 
Boojee Beads
Worldwide
hats, scarves, and more
 
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Co-founder Lisa Harrington with employees' children in Guatemala.The beaded lanyards in the Boojee Beads A Mother's Promise™ collection are created by a women's cooperative in Guatemala made up of working mothers. The artisans learn business skills and earn fair trade wages that enable them to purchase food, clothing, and schooling for their children.

With each trip to this beautiful country (Guatemala) I fall more in love. Being able to make a positive difference in the lives of these special people is truly a gift...

–Kimberly Martinez, co-founder

  • Guatemala
  • Haiti
  • Cape Town, South Africa
Bridge for Africa
Africa
for the homehandbags
Fair Trade Federation member
 

Gone RuralBridge (Building Resources to Inspire Dignity, Growth, and Empowerment) for Africa pays artists in Africa a living wage, promotes sustainable development in Africa, and educates consumers in the US about the benefits of Fair Trade as a method to fight poverty in the developing world.

  • Amarasti, Swaziland
  • Gone Rural (pictured), Swaziland
  • Royal Bark Cloth Designs, Uganda
The Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco
Peru
handbagsfor children
 
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Nilda Callanaupa Alvarez and a colleagueCarrying on the thousands-year-old tradition of weaving on a backstrap loom, Nilda Callanaupa Alvarez, together with her organization, The Center for Traditional Textiles of Cusco, offers a variety of handmade items with the primary goal of preserving the cultural art form of weaving. Proceeds go toward fair wages for the women and training.

I have learned that each piece of cloth embodies the spirit, skill, and life experience of an individual weaver.

–Nilda Callanaupa Alvarez, founder and weaver

 
Creative Women
worldwide
hats, scarves, and more
Fair Trade Federation member
 

Creative WomenCreative Women partners with women-owned and -employed studios in Ethiopia, Mali, Swaziland, and Afghanistan to create contemporary accessories and accents for the home that are made using traditional techhniques.

By buying Creative Women products, you, too, are creating beautiful things...in your own life and in the lives of the hundreds of women we work with.

–Ellen Dorsch, founder

  • Ethiopia
  • Mali
  • Swaziland
  • Afghanistan
Downtown Women's Center
US
forthehomestationeryhandbags
 
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Made by DWC soy candle workshopDirectly benefiting homeless and low-income women at L.A.'s Downtown Women's Center (DWC), Made by DWC aims to help women escape the cycle of poverty by offering job skills training and product development opportunities. Their new 72-bed facility includes a state-of-the-art computer lab where facilitators teach computer skills and assist with job searches, plus workshop space where women learn to make handicrafts that they can sell in the store downstairs. Many of the materials used to create these items are in-kind donations to the DWC.

  • Los Angeles, CA, US
Dream Out Loud Productions
South Africa
jewelry
 
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Orphan Bracelet artisanInspired during the making of her documentary Angels in the Dust, which explores the plight of children due to widespread HIV/AIDS in South Africa, director Louise Hogarth launched the Do Ubuntu Orphan Bracelet Campaign. This project supports a number of local programs, including a crafter's training program that teaches women how to craft the bracelets, run their own businesses, open bank accounts, and other life skills. Each rubber orphan bracelet is handcrafted using lead-free copper, brass, and aluminum wire. All proceeds directly benefit mothers and children affected by HIV/AIDS.

It's a small thing you can do in your life, but it's a huge thing in these children's lives and in parents' lives.

–Louise Hogarth, filmmaker and founder

 
Dunitz and Company
Guatemala
jewelryhats, scarves, and more
Fair Trade Federation member
 

The beadwork on all of Dunitz and Company's jewelry and accessories are done in Guatemala by local Mayan Indian women. Founder Nancy Dunitz works with local women to design the products, incorporating things like vintage buttons and tagua slices into their designs.

Once I spent time in Guatemala—building my product line and meeting the friends and designers I now consider my 'second family'—I found I didn't need or want to go anywhere else.

–Nancy Dunitz, founder

 
Emilime
Peru
hats, scarves, and more
 
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EmilimeAll Emilime knit products are handknit by women in Peru from locally sourced alpaca and sheep's wool.

I try to be as honest as I possibly can and show these artisans that I appreciate them and what they do. Without them, Emilime would not exist.

–Emily E. Green, founder

 
Fatim Diallo
Mali
for the home
 
 

Fatim DialloFatim Diallo learned the art of leatherwork from her grandmother at the age of seven. Her success has allowed her to employ other women from her village to help create her leather bags and pillows.

 
Global Goods Partners
worldwide
for the homehandbagsfor children
Fair Trade Federation member
 

Alma de los AndesGlobal Goods Partners (GGP) is a nonprofit that creates economic opportunity for women artisans in some of the world's poorest communities by providing access to the US market for the fair trade, handmade products they produce. Working in partnership with more than forty women-led community organizations that implement lasting social change through rights training, health care, and education programs, GGP provides technical assistance, product development, operational expertise and small capacity building grants to its community-based partners.

  • Alma de los Andes (pictured), Bolivia
  • Artisans Association of Cambodia, Cambodia
  • Gone Rural, Swaziland
  • Ikamva Labantu, South Africa
  • Manuela Ramos, Peru
  • Maasai Women Development Organisation, Tanzania
  • Sumaq Qara, Peru
Global Mamas
Ghana
for the homejewelryhats, scarves, and morefor children
Fair Trade Federation member
 

Global MamasGlobal Mamas is made up of a number of women-run studios throughout Africa and provides business management and product development training to allow women in the Global Mamas network to grow their own businesses.

[I want to] be a role model to people...an entrepreneur...and have the basic things in life.

–Jennifer Benedicta Ocran, Global Mama, batiker

 
Good Paper
worldwide
stationery
Fair Trade Federation member
 

Sanctuary Spring artisanQuirky and clever, each Good Paper greeting card is handmade by a woman trying to escape prostitution in the Philippines or a young adult orphaned by disease or genocide in Rwanda. Each beautifully pressed journal and memory book is made by groups of women building their own businesses from the confines of their own homes. Each card is signed on the back by the woman who created your card.

I really have a heart for the children in the streets. My dream is to be a social worker. Hopefully, I can go to school now so that I can see those dreams come true.

–Samyla, employee in the Philippines

  • Cards from Africa, Rwanda
  • Sanctuary Spring (pictured), the Philippines
  • Himalayan Mill, India
The Green Egg
Haiti
for the homehandbagshats, scarves, and more
 
 

Haiti Projects cooperative member

  • Haiti Projects, Haiti
Handmade Expressions
worldwide
for children
Fair Trade Federation member
Watch video

SURE cooperative members

  • Craft Resource Center, India
  • International Foundation for Fairtrade and Development (IFFAD), India
  • SURE cooperative, Rajasthan
  • Unique, Rajasthan
Hope for Women
worldwide
stationery
Fair Trade Federation member
Watch video

Hope for Women artistsHope for Women is committed to providing sustainable employment for economically disadvantaged women worldwide. They are passionate about helping women take control of their own lives and their own futures.

At Hope For Women, we have come to understand that supporting the Fair Trade movement can be a choice that defines a lifestyle. Buying fairly is a step towards living fairly.
  • India
  • El Salvador
Iconz
Cape Town
for the homestationery
 
 

Iconz designs products with collages featuring embossed antique metals handmade by previously unemployed women in Cape Town.

 
JADE Tribe
Laos
for the homehandbags
 
 

JADE Tribe weaverAll artisans receive a fair and living wage for their weaving work, allowing them to build better homes and living conditions, and to create educational opportunities for their children.

Each element of JADEtribe carries a piece of [my] heart and the hearts of the women whose lives have improved by making it.

–Kimberly Hartman, founder

 
Kadyrkul and Farzana Sharshembieva
Kyrgyzstan
hats, scarves, and more
 
 

Passed down to her by her grandmother before she was ten years old, Kadyrkul Sharshembieva uses ala-kiyiz, a traditional felting technique utilized by nomadic cultures since the seventeenth century. Kadyrkul works with her sister Farzana, as well as her daughters and nieces, continuing to pass down the embroidery and feltwork techniques of their ancestors.

 
Kandahar Treasure
Afghanistan
handbags
 
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Kandahar Treasure artisansKandahar Treasure is an organization of Afghani women who use khamak—a traditional embroidery technique exclusively performed by and passed down to women in Kandahar—to adorn home goods and fashion accessories. Kandahar Treasure allows women to work in their own homes and earn money, thus making them an asset within their family and changing the social reality of women within Afghan society.

I would like the world to know that women [as] stakeholders of their country and their society and their families are better advocates for peace and stability in their nation.

–Rangina Hamidi, founder

 
Kismet
India
for the homehandbagsstationery
 
 

Kismet workshopAt Kismet Style, all products are handmade by women in India seeking to support themselves and their families on their own terms.

Kismet is about one woman wanting to make a difference...Creating opportunity and empowerment for the women of India—one woman at a time—has been my mission for the past ten years.

–Anne Driver, founder

 
Laga Handbags
Indonesia
handbags
 
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Vina, a Laga Handbags artisanLaga handbags are handmade in Aceh, Indonesia by women who survived the 2004 tsunami. The wonderfully creative hand-guided embroidery patterns have been passed down through the generations and are indigenous to this area. Laga handbags are sewn on pedal-driven, non-electric treadle machines, which makes each handbag a unique piece of historical art.

While working in the Laga workshop, I felt happy because I got new experiences, and I did not have to depend on my parents anymore. And with a little bit of extra money, I could help my family.

–Vina (pictured), employee and seamstress

 
Leah Singh
India
for the home
 
 

 

  • Chizami Weaves / North East Network, India
  • Katna's Katha / Street Survivors India, India
The Leakey Collection
Kenya
jewelry
 
Watch video

Maasai women

Our experience and every fair-traded company that we know and that we work with and that we are affiliated with has seen a vast improvement in health, education, job opportunity...it has been translated even into the political stability of the areas where these operations and products are produced...your money is having direct positive change in the world.

–Katy Leakey, co-founder

 
Lua Chea Accessories
Argentina
jewelryhats, scarves, and more
 
 

 

 
Lucuma Designs
Peru
for the homefor children
 
 

Lucuma Designs finger puppet artist

Thank you very much for buying puppets and I hope you are careful with them. Things are hard here, so thank you for buying puppets because it helps us to live.

–Georgina Palomino, finger puppet artist

 
Manos de Madres
worldwide
for the homejewelryhandbagshats, scarves, and morestationery
Fair Trade Federation member
 

INEZA Rwanda cooperative memberFounded by a mother and her two daughters, Manos de Madres works with existing women's cooperatives and provides financial, technical, and business training support as well as creative assistance in product development and production to the women in the cooperatives. One of these cooperatives is INEZA Rwanda, which supports women who are living with HIV/AIDS as a result of genocidal rape and sexual violence.

  • Ineza WE-ACTx (pictured), Rwanda
  • Solidarite, Rwanda
Meena Mahal Arts
South and Southeast Asia
for the home
 
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Meena Mahal Arts artisans

 
Monkeybiz
South Africa
for the home
 
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Phathiswa Ncaphayi, Monkeybiz artistMonkeybiz is a nonprofit working to provide sustainable employment to economically empower women in the under-resourced areas of South Africa. All proceeds go toward community services as well as a burial fund for the artists and their families. Each artwork is signed by the artist.

One of the most rewarding aspects of the business is to help those who weren't even aware of their talent become artists.

–Barbara Jackson, late co-founder

 
Mushmina
Morocco
for the homejewelryhats, scarves, and more
 
 

Oumaima, Mushmina artisan

We see our creative process as a global exchange of ideas and an opportunity to develop new relationships across cultures. In the way each of us contributes to this process, our products empower all people to be beautiful and expressive!
 
Nepali by TDM Design
Nepal
hats, scarves, and more
 
 

Nepali artisansTDM creates opportunities for poverty-stricken women to generate sustainable income in Nepal. In addition to substantially higher than average wages, a portion of TDM profits goes to help support the women and children of Nepal with health care and education.

 
Original Women
worldwide
for the homejewelryhats, scarves, and more
 
 

Artisans weaving coasters from recycled bagsOriginal Women supports women expressing their creativity and using their skills to make their lives, their families' lives, their communities, and our world a better place.

  • Burkina Faso
  • Chile
  • Ghana
  • East Timor
  • India
  • Mali
  • Pakistan
Ralli Quilts
South Asia
for the home
 
 

A Meghwar quilter from Thatta, Pakistan

  • India
  • Pakistan
Raven+Lily
worldwide
for the homejewelrystationery
 
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Raven+Lily works with HIV-positive women in Ethiopia as well as marginalized Muslim women in Northern India. A portion of the proceeds of Raven+Lily jewelry goes toward projects to fund education, healthcare, and micro-loans in these communities.

My heart and eyes are open. My life has been changed because of this program. Begging is like being dead. Now you can go into my home and there is food there. Thinking about this makes me want to cry...I was living in death. I am changed because of this program and now I am called to help other human beings.

–Amleset, employee in Ethiopia

  • Entoto Project, Ethiopia
  • India
Sandur Kushala Kendra
India
handbags
 
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Shati Bai, award-winning embroiderer of Sandur Kushala KendraOnce nomadic, Lambanies tribal women settled in the village of Sandur and have gained prominent social status within the community through hand-embroidery using traditional stitchwork, patchwork, and mirrors. Sandur Kushala Kala Kendra provides each of the women with a regularly paying job with benefits, allowing them to become self-sufficient while preserving the culture behind the embroidery.

Embroidery and my son is everything that I have today. Life for me revolves around the Kendra. I have grown here.

–Shati Bai (pictured), award-winning embroiderer

 
The Sankofa Center for African Dance and Culture
Ghana
for the homefor children
 
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Employees of the Sankofa Center's People Living With HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) Income Generation ProjectThe Sankofa Center is a charity working to educate youths and adults about HIV/AIDS through music and dance, as well as provide free HIV/AIDS counseling and testing. All products support the programs and help fund the purchase of life-saving anti-retro viral drugs.

You will not simply go away with great gift merchandise; but rather, a symbol of the commitment, love, and goodwill exemplified in our growing family throughout the world.

–Ronnie Shaw, director

 
Kakuben Babubhai Ahir, Self Employed Women's Association (SEWA) Trade Facilitation Centre
India
for the homefor children
 
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SEWAAfter living a nomadic life for nearly ten years in search of work, Kakuben Babubhai Ahir and her husband were able to settle down back in their village thanks to Kakuben's embroidery work with the SEWA Trade Facilitation Centre. She now has gained greater respect within her family, been able to gain an education for both her son and daughter, as well as regain and expand the agricultural land her family had previously mortgaged.

My journey, like the many of my fellow sisters in our company, is one filled with lot[s] of hope and joy.

–Kakuben Babubhai Ahir, embroiderer

 
Shkaa'la Fair Trade
worldwide
for the homejewelryhandbagsfor children
 
 

Shkaa'la artisanShkaa'la Fair Trade works with marginalized Mayan women in Guatemala and Mexico and Hmong women in Northern Thailand in an effort to provide an alternative source of income to them, while supporting worldwide causes and community development in economically disadvantaged areas.

I have to focus on what Shkaa'la's goals are, how we can empower one woman at a time. Focus on the fact that Fair Trade is not a charity, it is empowerment through opportunity. That is something to work hard for, don't you think? I do.

–Giovanna Mantilla, founder

  • Guatemala
  • Mexico
  • Northern Thailand
South American Accents
Peru
for the homefor children
 
 

 

As a young girl growing up in Lima, Peru, I eagerly anticipated trips with my parents to the tiny village of Mito, where my paternal grandmother lived. Our visits with her always included excursion to the homes of local artisans. For me, these visits were more like historical journeys. I listened attentively as grandmother explained the personal connection of each craftsman's work to cultural traditions and legends.

–Monica Allen, founder

 
Sweet Birds
Central America
for the homefor children
 
 

lacquer artist Maribel Jimenez of Chiapa de CorzoSweet Birds sources and purchases all products directly from indigenous artists, ensuring that they receive a fair price for their work while cultivating relationships with them and helping develop new products. Artists they work with include sculptor Josefina Aguilar and Oaxacan animal designer Maria Jimenez Ojeda of Oaxaca, Mexico, as well as lacquer artist Maribel Jimenez of Chiapa de Corzo (pictured).

The production of these toys encourages the continuation of long established hand-weaving techniques, while creating a unique source of income for dozens of women.

–Sara and Mark Garmon, owners

  • Guatemala
  • Mexico
  • Josefina Aguilar, Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Maria Jimenez Ojeda, Oaxaca, Mexico
  • Maribel Jimenez, Chiapa de Corzo, Mexico
Trading for Treasures
Rwanda
for the homejewelry
Fair Trade Federation member
Watch video

Trading for Treasures workshopTrading for Treasures is a Fair Trade organization that trains Rwandan women and provides them with sustainable employment. Proceeds from Rwandan handicraft support local projects, including Gahaya Links, which benefit the people of Rwanda.

As the leader of my cooperative, I have dedicated my time to the well being of all the women. I make sure that we invite as many women in the community as we can to join us. Our lives have changed and we want everyone to benefit...Our goal is that every weaver in our group will live in a decent home where she feels proud to live, where our children can play and live a normal life, which we didn’t have while growing up.

–Mukamuhoza Mamerita, cooperative leader working with Gahaya Links

  • Gahaya Gifted Hands, Rwanda
  • Gahaya Links, Rwanda
Wakami / Kiej de los Bosques
Guatemala
jewelryfor children
Fair Trade Federation member
Watch video

Santa Elena Barillas coop workshopWakami works with a number of women's groups throughout Guatemala, like Women of Monte Redondo, to create their products. Wakami also works with Kiej de los Bosques, a company that links rural Guatemalan communities to wider markets, in addition to providing business incubation and help in the design and development of new products.

Wakami is a dream come true for my community. I feel satisfied to be the bridge that makes it possible for women in my community to generate income; this not only makes me feel important, but also helps them provide a better life to their kids.

–Sandra Solares, group leader of Women of Monte Redondo

  • Magdalena Milpas Altas, Guatemala
  • Panimacoc, Guatemala
  • Santa Elena Barillas (pictured), Guatemala
  • Women of Concepcion, Guatemala
  • Women of Monte Cristo, Guatemala
  • Women of Monte Redondo, Guatemala
Wild Hope Artisans Project
Africa
for the homejewelry
 
 

Wild Hope artisansThe Wild Hope Artisans Project provides income generation to nearly one hundred Maasai women by allowing them to preserve traditional art forms while producing innovative and marketable products. These women are able to gain standing within their communities, feed their children, open up their own shops, and give back toward community development as a result.

They gave us an opportunity for supporting ouselves through the work of beads...The women are providing for their families and growing in their business skills.

–Peter Kukan, manager for the Wild Hope artisans

  • Kenya
  • Tanzania
Women for Women International
worldwide
jewelry
 
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Women for Women jeweler in AfghanistanAmong many programs, Women for Women International helps to secure economic stability by providing job-skills and business skills training, as well as aiding in the creation of cooperatives, farming initiatives, and entrepreneurship. All products are made by graduates of the program. Women for Women International also serves as a content partner in the development of the exhibition Women Hold Up Half the Sky.

  • Afghanistan

Take home treasures "wrapped up in thousands of years of history and culture." - Museums Los Angeles